Vol. 6 No. 1 (2021)

Psychological Capital and Information Literacy Skills as Determinants of Job Performance of Academic Library Employees in State Universities in South West, Nigeria 

Sunday O. Popoola
Department of Library, Archival and Information Studies, 
University of Ibadan, 
Ibadan Nigeria

William Peter Tabuke
Department of Library, Archival and Information Studies, 
University of Ibadan, 
Ibadan Nigeria

Abstract

Rationale of Study – This study investigated psychological capital and information literacy skills as determinants of job performance of academic library employees of state universities in South-West, Nigeria. The specific objectives are to determine the levels of psychological capital, information literacy skills and job performance of the respondents and to ascertain the relationships among psychological capital and job performance of the respondents. 

Methodology – The survey research design was adopted. The total enumeration technique and validated questionnaire were used to gather data on a population size of 140 academic library employees with 100 percent response rate achieved.

Findings – The findings revealed that psychological capital (r=0.636, p<0.05) and information literacy skills (r=0.682, p<0.05) had significant relationships with job performance of the respondents. Also, psychological capital had significant relationship with information literacy skills of the respondents (r=0.716; P<0.05). More importantly, psychological capital and information literacy skills significantly determined job performance of the respondents (F=60.004, df=2; 115; Adjusted R square=0.5020; P<0.05).

Implications – The study demonstrates that psychological capital and information literacy skills are critical ingredients in enhancing job performance of academic library employees in state universities in South-West, Nigeria.

Originality – Few study has been done on psychological capital and information literacy in relation to job performance of academic library employees. 

Keywords

Psychological capital, information literacy skills, job performance, academic library employees Nigeria 

COVID-19 Spread Acceptability, Attitude and Information Accessibility amongst Rural community in Delta State, Nigeria

Mercy Arodovwe Igere
Department of Library and Information Science, Delta State University
Abraka PMB 1 Delta State, Nigeria
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Igere, Bright Esegbuyota
Department of Microbiology and Biotechnology, Western Delta University 
Oghara PMB 10 Delta State, Nigeria
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Abstract

Rationale of Study – There are several pieces of unreliable information on the spread of the virus COVID-19. This leads to misconception on the existence and spread of the virus. It also affects the attitude of people, most especially the rural dwellers. This study investigates COVID-19 spread acceptability, attitude and information accessibility in a rural community in Delta State, Nigeria. 

Methodology – The study adopted a descriptive survey design. The population for the study was 145,045. A sample of 0.1% of the population was used for analysis. Data was collected using questionnaires. The questionnaires were purposively administered to the sampled respondents in the homes of the ten (10) villages in Uvwie local government area in Effurun, Delta State, Nigeria.

Findings – The study found that people no longer accept information on the existence and spread of the virus. This is because available information regarding the spread of the virus is either fake or unreliable. Consequently, individuals no longer see the need to adhere to the measures put in place to stop the spread of the virus.

Implications – The study recommends an awareness campaign to be conducted on the spread of the virus in the rural communities. It also emphasises an altruist verification of all information concerning the virus as it will help to change the attitude of the populace.

Originality – The manuscript is part of our recent study which was informed by the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak, and has not been submitted for evaluation on the purpose of publication in journal. 

Keywords

COVID-19, acceptability, attitude, information, accessibility, rural community, Delta State, Nigeria

Digital Resources Management: A Panacea for Digital Information Service Delivery in Nigerian Academic Libraries

Sylvester Israel Ebhonu (CLN)
Admiralty University Nigeria.
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Ademola Ferninand Omosekejimi (CLN) 
Federal University of Petroleum Resources Effurun
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Grace Arerosuoghene Dada (CLN)
Delta State University Library, Abraka, Delta State, Nigeria
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Abstract

Rationale of Study – The purpose of this study was to examine the concept of digital resources management as a possible enabler of effective digital information service delivery in Nigerian academic libraries. 

Methodology – A descriptive survey method was adopted for this study. The population of the study comprised of eight hundred and forty-one (841) librarians from 84 university libraries in Southern Nigeria. The entire population of 841 librarians was used in the study. Questionnaires were used to collect data which was analysed using descriptive statistics.

Findings – The study found that, the types of digital information resources available for use in university libraries in Southern Nigeria are e-books, e-journals, e-newspapers, e-magazines, websites, and OPAC; the digital information services being rendered to users in university libraries in Southern Nigeria are e-mail and Internet based service among others.

Implications – This submission is a work by the researcher and to the best of the researcher’s knowledge contains no materials previously published or written by another person.

Originality – Proper management of digital information resources using strategies such as normalisation, encapsulation, technology preservation, refreshing, replication, migration and emulation will help to keep library digital information resources in good shape and will also assist the university libraries to deliver effective digital information services to their users. 

Keywords

Digital Resources, Resources Management, Information Services, Service Delivery, Academic Libraries, Southern Nigeria 

Modelling and Forecasting of COVID-19 New Cases in the Top 10 Infected African Countries from February 14 to September 06, 2020

Alemayehu Siffir Argawu
Ambo University, Ambo, Ethiopia
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Abstract

Rationale of Study – COVID-19 is a novel coronavirus that has resulted in an outbreak of viral pneumonia around the world. The total case has reached 3,581,783 (shared 78.5%) with 102,201 (84.4%) total deaths and 3,214,512 (78.7%) recoveries in the top 10 infected African countries as of April 28, 2021 at 10:30 am. This study models and forecasts COVID-19 new cases in the top 10 infected African countries from February 14 to September 06, 2020. 

Methodology – The COVID-19 new cases data was modelled and forecasted using curve estimation regression model and time series model from February 14 to September 6, 2020.

Findings – The cubic regression models for the data were relatively the best fit for Egypt, Ethiopia, Kenya, Morocco, Nigeria, and South Africa. The quadratic regression models for the data were the best fit for Cameroon, Cote dʹIvoire, and Ghana. The Algerian data was followed by the logarithmic regression model. In the time series analysis, the Algeria, Egypt, and South Africa COVID-19 new cases data have fitted the ARIMA (0,1,0), ARIMA (0,1,0), and ARIMA (0,1,14) models, respectively. The Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana and Nigeria data have fitted the simple exponential smoothing models. Ethiopia, Kenya, and Morocco data have followed the Damped trend, Holt, and Brown exponential smoothing models, respectively.

Implications – The findings of the study may be used for preparedness planning against further spread of the COVID-19 epidemic in African countries. The author recommends that as many countries continue to relax restrictions on movement and mass gatherings, and more are opening of their air spaces and other sectors, strong and appropriate public health and social measures must be instituted to prevent further spread of the virus.

Originality – The paper contributes a model which can be used to predict occurrence of new COVID-19 cases in top 10 infected African countries. 

Keywords

COVID-19 cases, African countries, curve estimation regression, time series models

Content Recruitment and Institutional Repositories in Kenyan Universities

Sang Lucy Jelagat
Moi University, School of Information Sciences
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Cephas Odini
Moi University, School of Information Sciences
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Justus Wamukoya
Moi University, School of Information Sciences
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Abstract

Rationale of Study – The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of institutional repositories in supporting teaching, learning and research in four selected universities in Kenya. 

Methodology – Mixed methods research approach and a multiple case design was used for this study. Data was collected using questionnaires administered to 370 students and 322 academic staff randomly in the four universities in Kenya. Face to face interviews were used to collect data from the university librarians, system librarians and research directors in these universities.

Findings – The study revealed that content in the selected institutional repositories was dominated by grey literature and was found to be inadequate, sometimes outdated and of poor quality. The findings also showed that although IRs in the selected universities contained many types of material covering many subjects, each specific subject area contained only a few materials. In addition, the results indicated that the rate of content recruitment in the selected IRs was very low.

Implications – The findings of this study can contribute to discussions about the reasons for poor content recruitment in IRs and used to develop an appropriate model; it is expected that staff will deposit their scholarly content in institutional repositories more readily.

Originality – Little has been documented on the effectiveness of content recruitment in institutional repositories in Kenyan universities. Therefore, this paper is a valuable addition to the existing literature on the subject. 

Keywords

Content, Content Recruitment, Institutional Repositories, Universities, Kenya

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